Driverless shuttle bus being tested in London (Video)

Driverless shuttle bus being tested in London (Video)

5,000 members of the public have singed up to ride in the autonomous prototype shuttle named ‘Harry’.

Autonomous vehicle tests are underway in London’s borough of Greenwich, with 5,000 members of the public signing up to take a ride on Oxbotica’s driverless shuttle.

Oxbotica has fitted its machine out with software called Selenium, which enables real-time navigation, planning, and perception in dynamic environments.

Dr Graeme Smith, CEO of Oxbotica, said that the shuttle “represents an enormous step forward on our journey of implementing real world mobility-as-a-service capability in an operational fleet which can ultimately run without human intervention”.

He added: “Greenwich is an ideal focus for these trials in urban pedestrianised environments and we hope to learn tremendously from how autonomous vehicles interact with pedestrians and cyclists in real-world settings.”

Harry has no steering wheel or pedals and it can detect up to 100 metres ahead of it and come to a steady stop. Over an eight-hour period of operation, a single GATEway shuttle will collect four terabytes of data – equivalent to 2,000 hours of film or 1.2 million photographs.

The focus of this study is not the technology, but how it functions alongside people in a natural environment. This first trial will explore people’s preconceptions of driverless vehicles and barriers to acceptance through detailed interviews with participants before and after they ride in the shuttle.

The shuttle is part of an £8 million research project called GATEway (Greenwich Automated Transport Environment) “to develop and investigate the use, perception and acceptance of fully automated vehicles in the UK” led by the UK’s Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) and funded by government and industry.

Oxbotica, spun out from Oxford University’s Mobile Robotics group, said its Harry project is one of a number of trials taking place as part of the GATEway Project to help understand the use, perception and acceptance of automated vehicles in the UK.

London joins other cities in the world which are offering rides on autonomous shuttles to the public. Lyon became the first city to operate a daily driverless bus service, which run along a 10-minute route in the Confluence area.




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    1 Comment

    1. thomas sherman

      October 10, 2017 at 12:45 pm

      in holland they were & are developing air bags that function as car bumpers as a way to prevent bicycles injuries. might be interesting to put them on this self driven vehicle. can’t recall who is doing this.

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