Armored truck’s cash rains on Atlanta highway (Watch)

Armored truck's cash rains on Atlanta highway (Watch)

Atlanta Police Asking Residents To Return Cash That Fell Out Of An Armored Truck!.

Windfalls are rare in life. The probability of good fortune is far diminished in the shadow of the mundane and terrible. However, for several drivers on I-285 in the Atlanta area yesterday evening, the scales appeared to tip in their favor. Video shows cash strewn about and flying through the air along the interstate as drivers rushed to pull over. Several took the opportunity to practice their cash-grabbing skills in preparation for “The Diamond Head Game revival.” It was a short-lived 1975 game show made famous by The Money Volcano, a windy tube of cash where contestants would grab as much money as they could before time ran out.

According to WSB Radio, the money wasn’t from some generous benefactor dispersing their mass fortune to the proletariat. Instead, an armored car traveling on the interstate had its side door open, sending thousands of dollars of cash into the air. Cars immediately began to pull over, creating a long line of vehicles on the highway’s shoulder. Thankfully, the impromptu cash grab caused no accidents or injuries.

Police estimate about $175,000 ended up along the interstate. But remember, windfalls are rare in life. Police say those who picked up cash along the interstate can’t keep it. Instead, it should be returned to the armored car company. However, WSB-TV 2 Atlanta took a pole where nearly 70 percent of respondents said the people who stopped to collect the cash should be allowed to keep it. Apparently, the law frowns on adults who have a “finders keepers” mentality.

Sgt. Robert Parsons of the Dunwoody police spoke with WSB Radio saying the drivers will have to return the money. Once police arrived at the scene, most of the cars were gone. Instead, Parsons told the station police would likely look at the video to identify the vehicles involved. This is how a windfall can turn into misfortune.




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